How To Paint Cabinet Doors

How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Painting Kitchen Cabinets Make sure your paint is well-stirred, then pour the paint into a paint tray. Load a roller or brush with paint. Start with cabinet doors, which will take longer to paint because you’ll need to allow dry time before you turn them over to paint the opposite side. If your shelves are adjustable and the inside of your cabinets needs a fresh coat of paint, now is the time to start painting them, as well. If they have never been painted, don’t start now. Paint cabinets with light coats. Painting thinner coats mean fewer drips for a high-quality paint job. Be prepared to apply at least two coats per side when painting kitchen cabinets. Don’t Paint Kitchen Cabinets Until You Read This!
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Make sure your paint is well-stirred, then pour the paint into a paint tray. Load a roller or brush with paint. Start with cabinet doors, which will take longer to paint because you’ll need to allow dry time before you turn them over to paint the opposite side. If your shelves are adjustable and the inside of your cabinets needs a fresh coat of paint, now is the time to start painting them, as well. If they have never been painted, don’t start now. Paint cabinets with light coats. Painting thinner coats mean fewer drips for a high-quality paint job. Be prepared to apply at least two coats per side when painting kitchen cabinets.
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Buy the Right Kitchen Cabinet Paint You’ll need to choose between acrylic enamel paint and alkyd paint for cabinets. Acrylic, or water-base, paints are low-fume and clean up easily with water. Alkyd, or oil-base, paints require good ventilation because the paint contains solvents that can irritate your lungs and make you feel sick. Alkyd options require mineral spirits for cleanup, but they provide a hard, durable paint finish. Whichever you use, buy the best quality paint you can afford for a lasting kitchen cabinet finish. A self-leveling paint that levels out the brush marks as the paint dries for a super smooth finish is often a good choice for painting kitchen cabinets. It does, however, set up fairly quickly, which can make blending brushstrokes tricky. Paint Cabinets with These Top Colors
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Remove Doors, Drawers, and Shelves The best way to paint cabinets is to remove the cabinet doors and drawers. You never want to paint over hardware, such as hinges and handles, because it will affect the way the cabinet functions. (If your hinges and hardware have been previously painted, you can contact a paint shop and ask to have them restored.) Make a map of how the doors and drawers go together in the kitchen, carefully labeling each piece with its position for easy reassembly. Use a cordless drill or screwdriver to remove hinges and hardware. If your cabinets have adjustable shelves, be sure to remove those — and the hardware that supports them — from the cabinets. Stylish Ideas for Kitchen Cabinet Doors
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Sand Lightly sand the doors on all sides and faces (Image 1). Use a wood sanding block to prevent rounding over the wood edges (Image 2). If your repainting project is just a facelift for the cabinets, you don’t need to sand and paint the inside of the cabinets; mask off the interiors with painters’ tape for a clean finish and sand only the front surfaces and visible edges of the cabinet face frames. When sanding, there is no need to remove all of the old paint if it is sound and well-adhered; just roughen the surface to provide the new paint with a firm, clean base for better adhesion. Pay particular attention to especially worn areas of old finish, which typically get the most use. Also be sure to sand over shiny areas to deglaze any remaining previous finish. Stubborn finishes may require rubbing with denatured alcohol and fine steel wool. If the old paint is flaking off in places, it indicates the finish did not adhere well to the wood surface. This is typically due to moisture or greasy residue getting under the paint layer or into the wood itself, which can be expected in kitchens. Sand these areas to bare wood and spot-prime with a stain-killing primer/sealer before repainting. Wherever you sand down to bare wood, try to blend or “feather” the edges where the old paint meets the wood so the new paint will lay flat, and the paint edges will not be visible or “telegraph” through the new finish. Thoroughly vacuum the sanding dust from all surfaces (Image 3). If you have a pneumatic air compressor, use high-pressure air to blow the dust out of crevices or molding details. Wipe down the areas to be painted with a tack cloth to pick up any remaining sanding residue (Image 4).
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Lightly sand the doors on all sides and faces (Image 1). Use a wood sanding block to prevent rounding over the wood edges (Image 2). If your repainting project is just a facelift for the cabinets, you don’t need to sand and paint the inside of the cabinets; mask off the interiors with painters’ tape for a clean finish and sand only the front surfaces and visible edges of the cabinet face frames. When sanding, there is no need to remove all of the old paint if it is sound and well-adhered; just roughen the surface to provide the new paint with a firm, clean base for better adhesion. Pay particular attention to especially worn areas of old finish, which typically get the most use. Also be sure to sand over shiny areas to deglaze any remaining previous finish. Stubborn finishes may require rubbing with denatured alcohol and fine steel wool. If the old paint is flaking off in places, it indicates the finish did not adhere well to the wood surface. This is typically due to moisture or greasy residue getting under the paint layer or into the wood itself, which can be expected in kitchens. Sand these areas to bare wood and spot-prime with a stain-killing primer/sealer before repainting. Wherever you sand down to bare wood, try to blend or “feather” the edges where the old paint meets the wood so the new paint will lay flat, and the paint edges will not be visible or “telegraph” through the new finish. Thoroughly vacuum the sanding dust from all surfaces (Image 3). If you have a pneumatic air compressor, use high-pressure air to blow the dust out of crevices or molding details. Wipe down the areas to be painted with a tack cloth to pick up any remaining sanding residue (Image 4).
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Do not forget to prime if you want your paint to stick and to achieve a professional finish. You don’t need many fancy tools to paint your cabinet doors—an angled brush and mini foam roller will do the trick. Try working in small sections with your angled brush and go over your work with the roller for a super-smooth finish. Once your paint has dried, do a final sanding with very fine grit sandpaper and apply a coat of satin polycrylic to make your cabinet doors extra durable. Once your cabinet doors are completely dry, you can reinstall them and put the hardware back on.
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How To Paint Cabinet Doors

Apply the Paint Watch video of this step. Start by painting the inside edges and openings of the face frames, then the outer cabinet sides, and finally the face frame fronts. This allows you to work quickly in the less critical areas, and enables you to see and correct any drips or smudges on the most visible areas. Next, paint the cabinet doors and drawer fronts, along with any separate wood pieces or moldings (Image 1). If these parts have raised or routed features, be sure to flow the paint into crevices and corners, but don’t allow it to accumulate in these spots (Image 2). Always apply paint in thin, light coats, but be sure to cover all areas. Thin coats leave fewer visible brushstrokes and dry more quickly. Don’t lay the finish on thickly and don’t overwork the brush — too many brush strokes will create air bubbles in the finish, leaving bumps and pits when it dries. Allow the paint to dry for at least four hours between coats. When dry, resand all surfaces lightly to prepare them for the second coat (Image 3), wipe away all sanding dust with a tack cloth (Image 4), then repaint. Two coats of quality paint are usually all that is necessary, but you may want to add a third coat because kitchen cabinets take lots of punishment from cooking heat and day-to-day use, and wood surfaces need all the protection they can get.
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Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-sanded-doors_s4x3 Closeup of kitchen cabinet doors after they were sanded. Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-prime-door-03_s4x3 Closeup of roller brush being used to prime the cabinet door. Painting Inside of Cabinets This project can take the better part of a weekend, but if done right, your kitchen will look brand new, and you’ll add value to your home. Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-second-coat_s4x3 Amy paints the edges of the cabinet door with a second coat of paint.