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Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair

Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair

Repair a Leaky Two-Handled Faucet Learn how to repair three types of double-handle faucets: ceramic disc, compression/reverse-compression and cartridge. Keep in mind that some cartridge bodies and ceramic disc bodies/cylinders can look similar. In most cases, the cartridge body doesn’t have moving parts. The ceramic disc body/cylinder does have moving parts that pivot to open the ports on the bottom. These instructions work for sink faucets in kitchens and bathrooms, as well as bathtubs and showers. Save Item Send to a FriendPrint Tools & Materials Tools Screwdrivers Slip-joint and Needle-Nose Pliers Adjustable and Hex Wrenches Materials Faucet Repair Parts Product costs, availability, and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Locate the Leak Determine which side of your faucet is leaking by shutting off the water supply valves one at a time. If the leak doesn’t stop after the first valve is turned off, it’s the other line that’s leaking. Once you determine which side is leaking, turn off both supply valves. If your valves are stuck, shut off the water main. You will have to replace hardware for both sides since you won’t be able to identify whether the hot or cold side is leaking. Disassemble the Old Faucet Step 1 Turn faucet handles to the “on” position to release any residual water. Close the drain and place a towel in the sink to protect the surface and catch any dropped parts. Step 2 Remove the aerator and inspect it for damage. If it’s stuck, soak a towel in vinegar and wrap it around the aerator to help loosen mineral deposits. After an hour, gently twist the aerator with a towel and pliers. Step 3 As you disassemble the old faucet, lay the parts in order on a flat surface and snap a picture for reference. Then, put those parts in a plastic bag and take them to the store with you when shopping. You may only require one part, but it may be best to buy a kit and replace everything, including a new aerator if yours is damaged. Ceramic Disc Faucets This type of faucet uses a cylinder with tiny discs on the bottom that control water flow. The most successful repair typically replaces the entire cylinder. Step 1 Loosen the set screw and remove the handle. Step 2 Unscrew the retainer nut or mounting screw and pull out the cylinder. Step 3 Set a new cylinder into place and reassemble the faucet. Step 4 With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Compression & Reverse-compression Faucets In this repair, you’ll replace the washer and O-ring or gasket on the valve stem, as well as the valve seat in the faucet. Step 1 Remove handles or knobs by prying off the temperature indicator cap and removing the screw. Pull the handles off the base. Some handles are removed by backing out a set screw. Step 2 Loosen the retaining screw with a wrench and take out the valve stem. Step 3 On the stem, remove the screw, washer and old O-ring. Step 4 Add plumber’s grease to the stem and install a new O-ring and washer. Replace the screw. Step 5 Remove the valve seat with a seat or hex wrench and insert a new one. Step 6 Reassemble your faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Cartridge Faucet Step 1 Unscrew the set screw to remove the handle. Remove the retaining clip or nut. Step 2 Gently pull out the cartridge and replace it with a new one Step 3 Reassemble the faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Good to KnowWhile you have the faucet disassembled, it’s a good idea to replace the seats and springs below the cartridge. They’re inexpensive and adding new ones should ensure your repair is complete. Aerator After reassembling your faucet, run the water for a few minutes to clear debris from the new parts. Replace the aerator. If your old aerator needs cleaning, soak it in white vinegar to remove buildup and deposits. Rinse it before installation. You May Also Like . . . Toilet Repairs How to Install a Kitchen Faucet Repair a Leaky Single-Handle Faucet Shop Lowe’s Faucet Repair & Parts Kitchen & Bar Faucets Bathroom Faucets & Handles Related Articles & Guides Clear Clogged Drains Replace a Bathroom Faucet Plumbing Repair Glossary Lowe’s Services Faucet Installation
kitchen sink faucet repair 1

Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair

Tools & Materials Tools Screwdrivers Slip-joint and Needle-Nose Pliers Adjustable and Hex Wrenches Materials Faucet Repair Parts Product costs, availability, and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Locate the Leak Determine which side of your faucet is leaking by shutting off the water supply valves one at a time. If the leak doesn’t stop after the first valve is turned off, it’s the other line that’s leaking. Once you determine which side is leaking, turn off both supply valves. If your valves are stuck, shut off the water main. You will have to replace hardware for both sides since you won’t be able to identify whether the hot or cold side is leaking. Disassemble the Old Faucet Step 1 Turn faucet handles to the “on” position to release any residual water. Close the drain and place a towel in the sink to protect the surface and catch any dropped parts. Step 2 Remove the aerator and inspect it for damage. If it’s stuck, soak a towel in vinegar and wrap it around the aerator to help loosen mineral deposits. After an hour, gently twist the aerator with a towel and pliers. Step 3 As you disassemble the old faucet, lay the parts in order on a flat surface and snap a picture for reference. Then, put those parts in a plastic bag and take them to the store with you when shopping. You may only require one part, but it may be best to buy a kit and replace everything, including a new aerator if yours is damaged. Ceramic Disc Faucets This type of faucet uses a cylinder with tiny discs on the bottom that control water flow. The most successful repair typically replaces the entire cylinder. Step 1 Loosen the set screw and remove the handle. Step 2 Unscrew the retainer nut or mounting screw and pull out the cylinder. Step 3 Set a new cylinder into place and reassemble the faucet. Step 4 With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Compression & Reverse-compression Faucets In this repair, you’ll replace the washer and O-ring or gasket on the valve stem, as well as the valve seat in the faucet. Step 1 Remove handles or knobs by prying off the temperature indicator cap and removing the screw. Pull the handles off the base. Some handles are removed by backing out a set screw. Step 2 Loosen the retaining screw with a wrench and take out the valve stem. Step 3 On the stem, remove the screw, washer and old O-ring. Step 4 Add plumber’s grease to the stem and install a new O-ring and washer. Replace the screw. Step 5 Remove the valve seat with a seat or hex wrench and insert a new one. Step 6 Reassemble your faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Cartridge Faucet Step 1 Unscrew the set screw to remove the handle. Remove the retaining clip or nut. Step 2 Gently pull out the cartridge and replace it with a new one Step 3 Reassemble the faucet. With the faucet knobs in the “on” position, slowly turn on the water supply. Too much initial pressure can damage the new hardware. Good to KnowWhile you have the faucet disassembled, it’s a good idea to replace the seats and springs below the cartridge. They’re inexpensive and adding new ones should ensure your repair is complete. Aerator After reassembling your faucet, run the water for a few minutes to clear debris from the new parts. Replace the aerator. If your old aerator needs cleaning, soak it in white vinegar to remove buildup and deposits. Rinse it before installation.
kitchen sink faucet repair 2

Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair

Search Add New Question While my faucet has two handles, they do not have a top that I can remove (hot/cold). They have a very small hole on each side of the faucet, but I have no idea what tool to use. What kind of faucet is this? wikiHow Contributor From your description, it could be the compression faucet type and that “small hole” on either side of the two handles is indicative of where to begin to unscrew them. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 14 I removed the screw on a compression faucet handle, but the handle still doesn’t come off. What is holding it on, and how do I get it off? wikiHow Contributor If you have an older faucet and it has calcium building up, that has the potential to cement the handle to the fixture. To deal with this, use Lime Away or CLR on the area to help dissolve the calcium. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 5 I have a pinhole leak on the top of the spigot on my kitchen faucet. How do I repair it? wikiHow Contributor You might try JB Weld and pack the hole using a Q tip, but it could be unsightly. Petroleum based fluids will clean residue off after it has set for 10 minutes. Other than that, you could just replace the faucet as the hole will most likely get bigger. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 2 The stem won’t come out. How can I get it out? wikiHow Contributor You can try putting the handle back on, tighten the set screw and pull up on it; or use lubricating oil to soften up rust buildup between stem and stem housing and then pull it up. You may have to get aggressive with channel locks and pull the stem out; however, that may damage the handle stem. Lastly, before you put a new stem in, wipe inside the stem valve to remove any rust or slime, then open the shut off valve to allow water to just bubble over the top for 10 seconds. This removes debris that will get up inside your faucet line and seriously reduce your water flow. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 3 Helpful 2 The type I have in my bathroom has neither holes nor caps. What can I do? wikiHow Contributor I have the same issue, no holes or side screws, but the handles are loose. I asked my hardware guy, he says these are throw away types that cannot be worked on (they’re not made to come apart). I am going to replace the faucet. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 9 Helpful 3 Can I fix the leak without turning the water off if I have the first type of shower in the article? wikiHow Contributor Always turn the water off. It’s easier than mopping up 30 gallons of water if you do something wrong. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 5 Helpful 2 For a leaky faucet, can I unscrew the tip that the water comes out of into the sink and replace a washer there? wikiHow Contributor Suppose that the washer is washed into the drain? It is best not to put unscrewed parts in the sink but on top of the counter and where they are sure to be safe. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 19 Helpful 3 What should I do if the screw is stripped? wikiHow Contributor If the screw is stripped, then that means that it can no longer be used. Buy a new screw that fits the same dimensions of the old screw at your nearest hardware store. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 7 Helpful 1 What if there are no turn off valves under sink? wikiHow Contributor Find the main valve of the water coming to your apartment or house an shut it off. You’ll have no water in the whole residence for the duration of the repair. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 0

Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair

Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair
Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair
Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair
Kitchen Sink Faucet Repair

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