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Kitchen Sink Leaking

Kitchen Sink Leaking

If you can’t pinpoint the source of the leak, it’s fair to suspect the sink drain, which only leaks when the sink is full of water, or the faucet. If it’s the sink drain that’s leaking, unscrewing it and repacking it with plumber’s putty will usually fix the problem. Although you usually notice faucet leaks above the sink, sometimes water can flow down the back of the faucet and drip underneath the sink without being visible. The procedure for fixing a leaking faucet depends on the type of faucet you have. It usually involves disassembly and replacement of one or two gaskets or washers.
kitchen sink leaking 1

Kitchen Sink Leaking

Fixing Other Leaks If you can’t pinpoint the source of the leak, it’s fair to suspect the sink drain, which only leaks when the sink is full of water, or the faucet. If it’s the sink drain that’s leaking, unscrewing it and repacking it with plumber’s putty will usually fix the problem. Although you usually notice faucet leaks above the sink, sometimes water can flow down the back of the faucet and drip underneath the sink without being visible. The procedure for fixing a leaking faucet depends on the type of faucet you have. It usually involves disassembly and replacement of one or two gaskets or washers.
kitchen sink leaking 2

Kitchen Sink Leaking

1-2 hours If you have a leak under your kitchen sink, the sink strainer may be the cause Fixing under-the-sink leaks is a project most homeowners can take on. These leaks are typically caused by a bad seal between the sink and the sink strainer. This guide will teach you the best way to fix the problem. WHAT YOU NEED FOR THIS PROJECT Hammer Needle-nose pliers TOOLS Hammer Needle-nose pliers 1 Disconnect the Slip Nuts Tip: The sink strainer assembly has quite a few nuts, washers and gaskets. Keep the parts in order as you remove them, and keeping notes or take a picture to help with putting everything back together. You may also need an extra pair of hands to hold the strainer in place with needle-nose pliers when you reattach the locknut. Loosen the slip nuts from both ends of the tailpiece with water-pump pliers. Next, remove the tailpiece. 2 Remove the Locking Nut Use a basket strainer wrench to remove the big drain locking ring under the strainer. If it won’t budge, loosen it by placing a screwdriver on the lugs and tapping the screwdriver with a hammer. Next, unscrew the locknut and remove the strainer assembly. 3 Scrape off Old Putty Use a plastic putty knife to scrape off the old putty on the drain opening. If you’re reusing the old strainer body, clean off the old putty under the rim of the strainer. 4 Apply Putty to the Drain Flange Apply a bead of putty to the underside of the drain flange then insert the drain into the sink. 5 Reassemble the Strainer From beneath the sink, place a rubber gasket and metal or fiber friction ring over the strainer. Secure the gasket and friction ring by screwing on the drain locking ring. Next, make sure the drain compression seal is seated properly in the drain locknut, then reinstall and tighten the drain locknut. Lastly, turn on the water and test for leaks.
kitchen sink leaking 3

Kitchen Sink Leaking

Homeowner story: “The caulk around my cast iron sink was in bad shape for years, but I didn’t worry about it until the plastic laminate in front of the sink began to loosen. I stuck my head under the sink and saw that the particleboard under the sink rim was black and swollen. When I poked at the rotten particleboard, it crumbled like charred wood. I had to replace all my countertops at a cost of $800. But I’m glad the old countertop gave me a warning sign—with a few more months of rot, that 100-lb. sink could have fallen into the cabinet below.”
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Kitchen Sink Leaking

A part of the kitchen that is frequent used is the kitchen that makes this a candidate for repairs when a sink drain pipe gets clogged up. The sink drain would be trapped with various materials and components from the cooking and washing activities that would trigger eventual clogging of the pipes. The normal problem of clogging is easy to solve unless a serious item caused it in which case the help of a plumber would be needed to correct the problem. There are a few components making up the kitchen sink drain like the strainer, rubber gasket, metal washer, and a big lock nut that may need to be dismantled in case clogging is heavy.
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Kitchen Sink Leaking

Now you have identified that the leak is caused by the faucet under the sink you will need to try and find out why it is leaking. There could be a crack in the pipes, the connection might not be good, or the valve might of gone.
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Kitchen Sink Leaking

Search Add New Question While my faucet has two handles, they do not have a top that I can remove (hot/cold). They have a very small hole on each side of the faucet, but I have no idea what tool to use. What kind of faucet is this? wikiHow Contributor From your description, it could be the compression faucet type and that “small hole” on either side of the two handles is indicative of where to begin to unscrew them. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 14 I removed the screw on a compression faucet handle, but the handle still doesn’t come off. What is holding it on, and how do I get it off? wikiHow Contributor If you have an older faucet and it has calcium building up, that has the potential to cement the handle to the fixture. To deal with this, use Lime Away or CLR on the area to help dissolve the calcium. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 5 I have a pinhole leak on the top of the spigot on my kitchen faucet. How do I repair it? wikiHow Contributor You might try JB Weld and pack the hole using a Q tip, but it could be unsightly. Petroleum based fluids will clean residue off after it has set for 10 minutes. Other than that, you could just replace the faucet as the hole will most likely get bigger. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 2 The stem won’t come out. How can I get it out? wikiHow Contributor You can try putting the handle back on, tighten the set screw and pull up on it; or use lubricating oil to soften up rust buildup between stem and stem housing and then pull it up. You may have to get aggressive with channel locks and pull the stem out; however, that may damage the handle stem. Lastly, before you put a new stem in, wipe inside the stem valve to remove any rust or slime, then open the shut off valve to allow water to just bubble over the top for 10 seconds. This removes debris that will get up inside your faucet line and seriously reduce your water flow. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 3 Helpful 2 The type I have in my bathroom has neither holes nor caps. What can I do? wikiHow Contributor I have the same issue, no holes or side screws, but the handles are loose. I asked my hardware guy, he says these are throw away types that cannot be worked on (they’re not made to come apart). I am going to replace the faucet. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 9 Helpful 3 Can I fix the leak without turning the water off if I have the first type of shower in the article? wikiHow Contributor Always turn the water off. It’s easier than mopping up 30 gallons of water if you do something wrong. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 5 Helpful 2 For a leaky faucet, can I unscrew the tip that the water comes out of into the sink and replace a washer there? wikiHow Contributor Suppose that the washer is washed into the drain? It is best not to put unscrewed parts in the sink but on top of the counter and where they are sure to be safe. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 19 Helpful 3 What should I do if the screw is stripped? wikiHow Contributor If the screw is stripped, then that means that it can no longer be used. Buy a new screw that fits the same dimensions of the old screw at your nearest hardware store. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 7 Helpful 1 What if there are no turn off valves under sink? wikiHow Contributor Find the main valve of the water coming to your apartment or house an shut it off. You’ll have no water in the whole residence for the duration of the repair. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 0
kitchen sink leaking 7

Kitchen Sink Leaking

1 Disconnect the Slip Nuts Tip: The sink strainer assembly has quite a few nuts, washers and gaskets. Keep the parts in order as you remove them, and keeping notes or take a picture to help with putting everything back together. You may also need an extra pair of hands to hold the strainer in place with needle-nose pliers when you reattach the locknut. Loosen the slip nuts from both ends of the tailpiece with water-pump pliers. Next, remove the tailpiece. 2 Remove the Locking Nut Use a basket strainer wrench to remove the big drain locking ring under the strainer. If it won’t budge, loosen it by placing a screwdriver on the lugs and tapping the screwdriver with a hammer. Next, unscrew the locknut and remove the strainer assembly. 3 Scrape off Old Putty Use a plastic putty knife to scrape off the old putty on the drain opening. If you’re reusing the old strainer body, clean off the old putty under the rim of the strainer. 4 Apply Putty to the Drain Flange Apply a bead of putty to the underside of the drain flange then insert the drain into the sink. 5 Reassemble the Strainer From beneath the sink, place a rubber gasket and metal or fiber friction ring over the strainer. Secure the gasket and friction ring by screwing on the drain locking ring. Next, make sure the drain compression seal is seated properly in the drain locknut, then reinstall and tighten the drain locknut. Lastly, turn on the water and test for leaks.

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