Painting Cabinet Doors

Painting Cabinet Doors

Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-sanded-doors_s4x3 Closeup of kitchen cabinet doors after they were sanded. Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-prime-door-03_s4x3 Closeup of roller brush being used to prime the cabinet door. Painting Inside of Cabinets This project can take the better part of a weekend, but if done right, your kitchen will look brand new, and you’ll add value to your home. Ultimate-How-To-Original_Paint-Cabinet-second-coat_s4x3 Amy paints the edges of the cabinet door with a second coat of paint.
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Painting Cabinet Doors

Painting the Cabinet Box Use painter’s tape to protect the wall or backsplash tile from paint drips or messes while painting kitchen cabinets. Cover the countertop with a drop cloth. Use a roller or paintbrush to paint the frame and sides of the cabinetry unit or cabinet box. If your cabinets have a lot of detailing, it will be easier to use a tapered brush. A roller works well on larger flat surfaces and flat-panel doors. Avoid painting inside the cabinet unless the shelves are fixed and would benefit from a fresh coat of paint. Paint cabinets in light coats, allowing it to dry completely between each coat. This can take a day or more per coat.
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Painting Cabinet Doors

Before you start painting, remove everything from your cabinets, clear off your counters, and cover your backsplash, appliances and floor. Next, you’ll need to remove all of the hinges, hardware, doors and drawers from your cabinets. If you label each door with masking tape, you’ll have a much easier time reinstalling all of them when you’re finished. If you plan on using the same hardware, keep it all in a plastic bag so you don’t lose any pieces or screws. It’s much easier to paint cabinet doors if you have a worktable, but 2×4 boards propped on buckets or boxes can work as well. If you’re really handy and have a garage, use wire or hangers to hang all the cabinet doors to make painting each side much more manageable.
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Painting Cabinet Doors

Painting Kitchen Cabinets Make sure your paint is well-stirred, then pour the paint into a paint tray. Load a roller or brush with paint. Start with cabinet doors, which will take longer to paint because you’ll need to allow dry time before you turn them over to paint the opposite side. If your shelves are adjustable and the inside of your cabinets needs a fresh coat of paint, now is the time to start painting them, as well. If they have never been painted, don’t start now. Paint cabinets with light coats. Painting thinner coats mean fewer drips for a high-quality paint job. Be prepared to apply at least two coats per side when painting kitchen cabinets. Don’t Paint Kitchen Cabinets Until You Read This!
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Painting Cabinet Doors

Step Twelve // Pro Secrets for Painting Kitchen Cabinets Hang Cabinets to Dry Between Coats Photo by Brian Wilder Painting cabinet doors is a trade-off between perfection and speed. John Dee, a perfectionist, prefers to do one side at a time, keeping the faces flat so they don’t get runs. But that’s 48 hours of drying time per door—one day per side. Here’s his method for painting both sides in a day. Twist two screw hooks into holes drilled in an inconspicuous door edge (the lower edge for bottom cabinets, the upper edge for top cabinets). Paint the door’s outside face as above. Let it dry for an hour while resting flat, then tilt the door up onto its hooks and put a drywall screw into an existing hardware hole. Hold the tilted door up by the screw and paint the door’s back side. When you’re done painting, pick up the door by the screw and one hook and hang both hooks on a sturdy wire clothes hanger. Suspend from a shower curtain rod or clothes rod until the door is dry.
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Painting Cabinet Doors

Remove Doors, Drawers, and Shelves The best way to paint cabinets is to remove the cabinet doors and drawers. You never want to paint over hardware, such as hinges and handles, because it will affect the way the cabinet functions. (If your hinges and hardware have been previously painted, you can contact a paint shop and ask to have them restored.) Make a map of how the doors and drawers go together in the kitchen, carefully labeling each piece with its position for easy reassembly. Use a cordless drill or screwdriver to remove hinges and hardware. If your cabinets have adjustable shelves, be sure to remove those — and the hardware that supports them — from the cabinets. Stylish Ideas for Kitchen Cabinet Doors
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Step Two // Pro Secrets for Painting Kitchen Cabinets Remove Doors, Drawers, and Shelves Photo by Brian Wilder Back out the hinge screws from the cabinet frame and remove the doors. Working methodically from left to right, top to bottom, label each one with a numbered piece of tape. Also, number the ends of cabinet shelves and the bottoms of drawers. Set aside the shelf-hanging hardware. At your worktable, remove the pulls and hinges and save what’s being reused. On the doors, transfer the number from the tape to the exposed wood under one hinge. Cover it with fresh tape.
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Make sure your paint is well-stirred, then pour the paint into a paint tray. Load a roller or brush with paint. Start with cabinet doors, which will take longer to paint because you’ll need to allow dry time before you turn them over to paint the opposite side. If your shelves are adjustable and the inside of your cabinets needs a fresh coat of paint, now is the time to start painting them, as well. If they have never been painted, don’t start now. Paint cabinets with light coats. Painting thinner coats mean fewer drips for a high-quality paint job. Be prepared to apply at least two coats per side when painting kitchen cabinets.
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Painting cabinet doors is a trade-off between perfection and speed. John Dee, a perfectionist, prefers to do one side at a time, keeping the faces flat so they don’t get runs. But that’s 48 hours of drying time per door—one day per side. Here’s his method for painting both sides in a day. Twist two screw hooks into holes drilled in an inconspicuous door edge (the lower edge for bottom cabinets, the upper edge for top cabinets). Paint the door’s outside face as above. Let it dry for an hour while resting flat, then tilt the door up onto its hooks and put a drywall screw into an existing hardware hole. Hold the tilted door up by the screw and paint the door’s back side. When you’re done painting, pick up the door by the screw and one hook and hang both hooks on a sturdy wire clothes hanger. Suspend from a shower curtain rod or clothes rod until the door is dry.
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I am currently right in the middle of painting my kitchen cabinets, so I’ve developed a system that is successful in my opinion. I gave each cabinet/door a letter (A, B, C … for wall cabinets; Ab, Bb, Cb … for base cabinets). I wrote the letter twice on blue tape, then stuck one letter in the cabinet and the other in the hinge bore hole (so I could prime/paint right over the hole) of the corresponding door. As Meredith says, prime before painting: I used Zinsser Cover Stain and actually did 3 coats of primer, sanding in between. I, too, am using the BM Advance paint with a Picasso brush and a small mohair roller; 3 not-too-heavy coats of paint, sanding in between. The Advance paint is great and levels very nicely, but you must wait 16 hours before sanding and recoating, so it takes time. My routine is to do a paint coat a day over three days. Then, the longer it cures the harder it gets and the better it looks! Oh, and while painting, once a coat has started to set up, don’t go over it with the roller! It’s a time consuming project, but I recommend these products and procedure.
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